Anonymous asked: What is 50 shades of grey about? And what's so bad about it?

therealbarbielifts:

middleclassreject:

dysonrules:

aconissa:

50 Shades of Grey was originally fanfiction based on the Twilight series, which was then published as a novel (along with 2 subsequent books). It sold over 100 million copies around the world and topped best-seller lists everywhere. It’s about to be adapted into a film, set to come out early next year.

It follows a college student named Ana Steele, who enters a relationship with a man named Christian Grey and is then introduced to a bastardised and abusive parody of BDSM culture.

While the book is paraded as erotica, the relationship between Ana and Christian is far from healthy. The core mantra of the BDSM community is “safe, sane and consensual”, and 50 Shades is anything but. None of the rules of BDSM practices (which are put in place to protect those involved) are actually upheld. Christian is controlling, manipulative, abusive, takes complete advantage of Ana, ignores safe-words, ignores consent, keeps her uneducated about the sexual practices they’re taking part in, and a multitude of other terrible things. Their relationship is completely sickening and unhealthy.

Basically, “the book is a glaring glamorisation of violence against women,” as Amy Bonomi so perfectly put it. 

It’s terrible enough that a book like this has been absorbed by people worldwide. Now, we have a film that is expected to be a huge box-office success, and will likely convince countless more young women that it’s okay not to have any autonomy in a relationship, that a man is allowed to control them entirely. It will also show many young men that women are theirs to play with and dominate, thus contributing to antiquated patriarchal values and rape culture.

REBLOG FOREVER.

Boycott this fucking movie, for the love of god. These kinds of ideas are dangerous and set us back as a society 

There we go this explains this perfectly

xehyun:

xehyun:

if someone calls you a slut, break their fucking neck without even hesitating or saying a single word and as they lay there on the ground dead, lean down close to their corpse and whisper

slut means the end in swedish

this is the most popular post i’ve ever made and its still fuckin going and i am GLAD

(Source: hideiwa, via aestheticrecompense)

Your voice sounds completely different in different languages. It alters your personality somehow. I don’t think people get the same feeling from you. The rhythm changes. Because the rhythm of the language is different, it changes your inner rhythm and that changes how you process everything.

When I hear myself speak French, I look at myself differently. Certain aspects will feel closer to the way I feel or the way I am and others won’t. I like that—to tour different sides of yourself. I often find when looking at people who are comfortable in many languages, they’re more comfortable talking about emotional stuff in a certain language or political stuff in another and that’s really interesting, how people relate to those languages.

—Francois Arnaud for Interview Magazine (via intertextualite)

(Source: iraplastic, via basementcat)

farfromthepacific:

moshetei:

Giant pudding for men. Man pudding. It’s man because it’s giant.

Using the most masculine pronoun too

farfromthepacific:

moshetei:

Giant pudding for men. Man pudding. It’s man because it’s giant.

Using the most masculine pronoun too

claudiagray:

In journalism school, you’re taught to look at a whole layout, to see how everything does or does not work together. Here are some reasons why they teach you that.

(Source: srabaskerville, via jellybabiestomanual)

alegrialeslie:

natsukashii  (なつかしい)
There is no direct translation for this word in English.  I love this word, particularly because I feel it often.

alegrialeslie:

natsukashii  (なつかしい)

There is no direct translation for this word in English.  I love this word, particularly because I feel it often.

(Source: word-stuck, via moshetei)